100 Books Everyone Should Read Before They Die (Amazon)

Image result for 100 books to read
Amazon book editors have just released a list of their 100 Books To Read In A Lifetime.

Many of the books are 20th century classics or recent bestsellers – the oldest book on the list is Jane Austen’s 1813 masterpiece “Pride and Prejudice.” It also spanned multiple genres, with adult fiction, nonfiction, children’s, and young adult novels such as “The Hunger Games” and “Harry Potter” making the list.

“With 100 Books to Read in a Lifetime, we set out to build a roadmap of a literary life without making it feel like a homework assignment,” Sara Nelson, Editorial Director of Print and Kindle Books at Amazon, said in a press release. “Over many months, the team passionately debated and defended the books we wanted on this list. In other words, we applied plenty of the bookish equivalent of elbow-grease, and we can’t wait to hear what customers have to say about our final picks.”

from Pocket

via Did you enjoy this article? Then read the full version from the author’s website.

Advertisements

New Translations of Tolstoy’s ‘Anna Karenina’ (MASHA GESSEN, NewYork Times, DECEMBER 24, 2014)

What difference is there between being repelled, being repulsed, being disgusted and being offended? Not much, perhaps, but consider the scene: Anna Karenina has taken a sip of coffee and raised her eyes to look at Vronsky, her lover, who is watching her. After hundreds of pages of love, lust, passion, fear, exhilaration, disappointment, exhaustion, aggression and, probably most important, jealousy, they are having their final fight. Leo Tolstoy is describing Anna ascribing an emotion to a man whose love she needs so desperately that she is convinced he has stopped loving her. Consider also this: When she lifted her coffee cup, she extended her pinkie away from it — a precious gesture that signals just how far this domesticated, miserable Anna has come from the glamorous young woman she was at the beginning of the novel; she made a sound with her lips — and she realized this when she lifted her gaze and saw Vronsky looking at her. She saw the most painful thing a woman can see: a lover who is turned off by her physical being.

In the classic translation by Constance Garnett, “she saw clearly that he was repelled by her hand, and her gesture, and the sound made by her lips.”

In the popular 2000 translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, she “clearly understood that he was disgusted by her hand, and her gesture, and the sound her lips made.”…..

from Pocket

via Did you enjoy this article? Then read the full version from the author’s website.

The Definitive Reading List of the 14 Best Books of 2014 Overall (Maria Popova, Brain Pickings,

From the origin of the universe to the unusual stories behind people’s tattoos, by way of secular spirituality, the hummingbird effect, and Werner Herzog.

I consider my annual best-of reading lists a kind of Old Year’s resolutions in reverse — unlike traditional resolutions, which lay out an aspirational list of priorities for the new year, these represent a look back at the books that proved themselves most worth prioritizing over the setting year. After such reverse-resolution reading lists for the best children’s books, art, design, and photography books, science books, philosophy and psychology books, bestbiographies, memoirs, and history books, here comes the annual wholly subjective selection of the fourteen most rewarding books of 2014 overall, in no particular order. (See last year’s selections here.)

from Pocket

via Did you enjoy this article? Then read the full version from the author’s website.

52 Things Ideas for Writers for 2015 (Brooke Warner , Huffington Post, 25 April 2015)

A couple years ago my friends and I made a list of 52 goals we wanted to accomplish, the equivalent of a bucket list for a year’s worth of achievable things. Most of them were simple goals, but measurable. For instance, you couldn’t just write “read more” as a goal. It had to be quantifiable, like “Read a book a month.” It was fun, but also challenging, both to put the list together and to accomplish all the things I came up with. By the end of 2012 I’d done a little more than half of the things on my list.

If you look online you’ll see lots of spin-offs on the 52 things concept — 52 things you want to and can achieve in the 52 weeks of next year. I’m a firm believer that it’s good to have goals, but also to hold them gently. In a list of 52 things to accomplish in a year, actually doing 18-20 of those things is pretty amazing. You can always defer the rest to the next year, after all. So if you want to create a 52 Things list this year, and you’re looking to add some writing goals to your list, here are my 52 ideas:

from Pocket

via Did you enjoy this article? Then read the full version from the author’s website.

Banglophilia (Salil Tripathi, Kindle Magazine, December 30, 2014)

Banglophilia(In the age of cultural insularity, Salil Tripathi reminisces about his love for another language, another culture and simply another way of living … What unfolds is a story of journeys through books, streets and memories seeped in Bangaliana …)

I was born in Bombay in a middle class Gujarati home where my parents seemed to have had distinctly non-Gujarati priorities. Acquiring wealth or money was never their goal, and there was never enough of that either. For example, it took my parents 19 years to buy their first refrigerator (I have memories of going to our neighbours’ to get some ice when needed; of my mother going to keep leftover food in their fridges, to be brought home the next day and reheated). We had to wait for a phone connection (though the blame for that could be laid at the doorstep of the government because we had been waiting in a queue to get the connection); and we were among the last to buy a television set in our apartment complex – a full six years after television arrived in my city, just in time to watch Sunil Gavaskar score two centuries against Pakistan in a series India lost 0-2 in Pakistan.

But there was wealth of another kind – the books in our flat – many books – of philosophy and sociology (my mother’s subjects at the university), management and business (my father’s subjects at the university), and there were novels – in Gujarati and English. I remember my mother reading out stories of Tolstoy and Tagore to me. Instead of worshipping Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, our home was in awe of Saraswati, the goddess of learning, although we did not have her idol either. And as with many Indians of their generation that turned nationalist under the influence of Mohandas Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore, my parents looked at Bengal for inspiration.

Even before I was born, my mother had decided that if she had a boy, his name would be Salil, after Salil Chaudhuri, the Bengali music director of Hindi film songs; and if a girl, she would be named Sujata, after the Bengali director Bimal Roy’s eponymous film. (Eight years after I was born, my brother was born, and his name was decided -Utpal, chosen after Utpal Dutt, the Bengali thespian whom my mother first saw in the film Bhuvan Shome. Two years later, my youngest brother was born, and he too got a Bengali name – Pranav.)….

from Pocket

via Did you enjoy this article? Then read the full version from the author’s website.

Eleven books of poetry you should read this year (Sudeep Sen, Jan 18, 2015, Scroll.in)

Eleven books of poetry you should read this year
Some of the finest Indian writing in English is in the form of poetry. A poet and editor offers his recommendations.

Indian poetry in English (and in English translation) continues to delight readers. Last week we looked back at the best of Indian poetry in 2014. Now, we consider poetry books that are due out in 2015, including a few books that came out at the tail end of last year and were not noticed adequately, and some others that had slipped under the radar.

All One’s Blue, Kazim Ali
Kazim Ali’s All One’s Blue (HarperCollins) is a marvellous collection that showcases the best poetry from all his previous collections, including new poems. His work is marked with a finely concentrated use of language that pushes the understated lyric mode to its limit. Beautiful, intelligent, moving, wide-ranging and finely wrought ‒ this is poetry not just for poetry and literature lovers, but everyone. Kazim Ali is an outstanding poet, and you will be fundamentally changed after immersing in his verse.

from Pocket

via Did you enjoy this article? Then read the full version from the author’s website.